Dear Walmart:

walmart-analysis-25-638.jpg  Dear Walmart,

You changed the face of retail. When you opened yourself to the public in 1962, your growth was evident and rapid, to the extent that in 1970 you were financed to keep expanding. You quickly began acquiring associates, which lead to a greater expansion of your business. You are indeed capable of selling low-price, high quality products, which altered one’s viewpoint of business itself in a positive, yet more challenging way. You were able to maintain your costumers, as these were satisfied with your services. You were also able to redefine westernization as something that involved the production of more, for less; which allowed you to become one of the most global brands in the world.

 

Dear Walmart,

You changed the face of retail. In 1962 when you opened yourself to the public, you signaled an apocalypse towards local stores, to the extent that in 1970 many of these stores had to close. You quickly began acquiring associates and expanding, which led to a decrease in the regional economic framework. You were indeed capable of selling low-price, high quality products, which added to the turmoil faced by smaller shops, whose owners, maintained by their small business, did not have the facility of selling their products at a lower-cost. You were also able to maintain your costumers, who used to be those that shopped their groceries at “Ye’old mini market.” You redefined westernization, as many other international stores desired to imitate your overall concept. This allowed you to become one of the most global brands in the world.

 

Dear Local Stores,

I admire you, for there will always be something unique about the things that negate themselves to modernization. It is not that modernization is bad, on the contrary, it facilitates the life-style of many, however, I respect those things that dare to be single from commonality. Now a days, westernization is being promoted, and in a near future, the word itself will stop its resonance, given that it is so close to being fully achieved. Still, there are diminutive amounts of people that oppose to this massive movement, which include those behind you, local stores. I am sorry to inform you that you are no bible, nor any piece of work written by Shakespeare, timeless, but may your essence remain, and so may your perseverance. There is something truly remarkable about the things that commercialize themselves for their tradition and roots, rather than for their adaptation into a more urbanized, technological world. Eventually, these traditions will be for longed, as modernization will be so common that there will be no such thing as “modernization” itself, but an upgrade.

What if Japan had not chosen to westernize itself in the nineteenth century? What if it had avoided its practice of Social Darwinism? I am not claiming its economy would have been greater, there are many aspects to be analyzed in such situation, but wouldn’t its tourism be? I yearn of going to Africa; it is distinct from any other part of the world, as it bases its tourism on its local ethnicities, not on how contemporary it is, which enhance its exceptionality. Your existence is unusual, and unusual is today being sought for. Perhaps you can someday be sought for once again. I appreciate what remains from a world victim of globalization, therefore I appreciate your efforts, dear local stores.

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6 thoughts on “Dear Walmart:

  1. Great thoughts and views involving westernization! I do believe it’s important that any country or region maintains its own essence and culture to enrich further generations.

    Liked by 1 person

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